Exotic Bubbles

As the STEM 3D-printing bubble-wand-creation activity continues to percolate throughout the district, students are learning and discovering new things about the nature and physics of bubbles.

For example, regardless of the shape of the wand: square, circular, triangular, or heart-shaped —

— or even butterfly shaped —

the bubbles will be spherical.

But what about double-bubbles? Or triple bubbles? Or raspberry bubbles?

Students discovered that wands with split or multiple openings create exotic bubbles.

Also, bubbles can be stretched between two different wands, as long as there is plenty of bubble juice on each wand.

 

Beginner Wands and Next Level

The students of 771K at 236 in Mill Basin Brooklyn enjoyed using the 3Doodler to make bubble wands. One student made all four on the beginner’s sheet:

Then the class teacher took her turn: she made a next-level pony wand!

Bubbles in a Row

All lined up, and floating on air.

Great Idea for February 14

Bubble wand in the shape of a heart!

More Than One Wand

To make a wand, or to not make a wand…

771k Makes Wands

Colorful bubble wands, handcrafted by students.

I Wonder…

Word is getting around and the wands are starting to wander! (No? You think of a better ‘wand’ pun then.)

Here are some photographs of 277Q at 311 students creating 3D printed plastic bubble wands. The templates helped.

Have Pens, Will Travel

I took my “pen and plastics” show on the road, this time to my alma mater, as it were, my “COVID-deployment” school. I am referring to 396K, where I taught science to developmentally-disabled k-4 graders — in person, during the “everyone-else-stayed-at-home” COVID year of 2020-2021.

I was welcomed with open arms and good wishes by the staff and students I knew from the previous year.

Here are students making bubble wands and more.

Bubble Wands at 811Q

I brought the 3Doodler printing pens and the plastic filament; the students brought their imaginations and bubble-blowing skills!

The activity started with a demonstration of how the pens work, including how to feed the filament in, how to charge the pens, how to turn them on and off, and how to start and stop the extrusion.

Next, I drew a small rectangle on a piece of paper, to use as a template to trace over with the pen. The melted plastic sticks nicely to the paper, and cools in a couple of seconds, so it can be easily peeled off.

It was the students’ turn. They drew shapes on paper, chose three favorite colors of filament, turned on their pens, and pressed the orange button! The trick to getting the plastic to stay true to a design is to press the end of the pen right onto the paper.

Some students got the gist of it right away and started working on their bubble wands.

Other students designed their favorite characters…Sonic anyone?

The students made a variety of wands, some from their imaginations and some from screen shots of wand designs that I had printed from off the internet. 3Doodler has some great 2D and 3D bubble wand ideas.

Here are wands the students made:

The last step was to go outside to the school yard and test them out. I am happy to report that there was 100% success rate for the bubble wands. We used Five Below bubble solution ($1.00 for a big bottle!) and the kids had so much fun!

Thank you Bonnie Glass for these photographs.

Image

October 2022
M T W T F S S
 12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
31